Friday, May 26, 2017

Cenk Uygur: The Democratic Party Takeover HAS BEGUN


The Democratic Party has failed. We’re going to rebuild it! Cenk Uygur, host of The Young Turks, tells you about how the Justice Democrats will takeover the party. https://www.justicedemocrats.com/


Cenk Uygur of The Young Turks and Kyle Kulinski of the Secular Talk have started the Justice Democrats to reclaim the Democratic Party from the Corporate Democrats and bring in real politicians to replace them representing the people, or "us", more precisely, as Cenk says. It seems inspirational to me. I hope they manage it in time before the next election and before the neoconservatives blow the planet up. They are asking for people to come forward to run to become politicians for the Democratic Party. There must be loads of very highly qualified people out there that would be very suitable for the job.

15 comments:

hog said...

please no.
not by these bill clinton surplus fanboys.

Penguin pop said...

Ro Khanna is the only one that's stood out to me so far b/c of him mentioning Stephanie Kelton on Twitter. Heard she's working with him, but he got flack for taking small campaign contributions from Silicon Valley by some progressives.

But yeah, I think I'm with hog on this one. There are many other people outside the TYT people who actually understand Bill Clinton surplus wasn't such a good thing.

Ryan Harris said...

What's in a name: The Young Turks. Lot of cultural baggage, I wonder why Cenk chose it.

Bob said...

A worthy plan, but a plan B (building a third party) will likely be needed. The Draft Bernie initiative is another example.

Bob said...

Young Turk as in someone eager for change.

Dan Lynch said...

Someone needs to introduce Cenk to the Iron Law of Institutions.

The Democratic party is where progressive ideas go to die.

Joe said...

According to Cenk, the name "The Young Turks" was thought up pretty much on a whim. When he first was signing up to do a public access show, he had to have a name for it and that was the first thing that came to mind on the spot. So there wasn't much thought there, it just stuck afterwards. Taken totally out of context, it's a pretty good name. Put the historical context in, and eh, probably not the wisest choice.

MRW said...

probably not the wisest choice. The Young Turks were the architects of the Armenian genocide. The Young Turks were the three Bey brothers. They were crypto-Jews from Thessalonika, as was Ataturk. Ambassador Henry Morgenthau wrote a chilling report to President Wilson, published in 1916 in The Sunday Times of London, detailing what Morgenthau called the barbaric "extermination of a people." The word genocide hadn't yet been coined. He described their "torture" and "cruelty" as something so breathtaking in its scope that the world had not seen its like since the days of the Inquisition. He wrote that the Young Turks studied the medieval Inquisition torture techniques for ideas and sought to improve upon them. The Sunday Times is now behind a paywall, but this letter/report is available in their archives, where I first read it. [Maybe it's called The Times of London. Kaivey could clear that up.]

Bob said...

So maybe TYT is not popular with Armenians, Kurds and Bulgarians. Just like in real life.

MRW said...

The Armenian genocide was unspeakably horrific.

Abe Foxman, who actively sought not to have it recognized, claimed it was only 1.5 million who died, and that the Holocaust was worse. When I was in Armenia--and knowing ZIP about it—I was taken to a museum that documented it. The Museum Director said 3 million died. As Morgenthau said, they “exterminated a people.” An American by the name of Robert Anderson had helped the Armenians become unusually prosperous in the 1880s and 1890s, and the boys from Thessalonika/Salonika were jealous, and wanted what they had.

The photos were a minimum of 6’ x 4’. Room after room after room. They were taken by a German photographer with an 18” x 24” negative camera (the kind where you stick your head under a curtain). The Bey brothers prohibited all pictures of the genocide on pain of death but somehow they allowed this guy (a German officer) to set up his tripod and photograph what they were doing.

It is the only record we have. The photographs were stunning in their subject matter and clarity, like a 4K 100” TV screen. You can find them on the web now.

I saw these when I was 17 years old when I had no opinion about Armenia one way or the other. What did I know? But it was utterly shocking to me. The images were indelibly imprinted on my mind at the time, and I thought everyone knew except me.

What galls me is that some of those photos—piles of emaciated naked bodies, 8/10 deep—were later used to peddle the horrors of the Holocaust—they even used one at Auschwitz—but until the internet, there was no way to prove it.

But I knew.

Andrew Anderson said...

I can see nothing intrinsically wrong with corporations; they are a means to consolidate capital for economies of scale in a some what democratic (per share) manner. The problem is that they are not broadly and relatively equally owned - as they might largely be IF we had not had government privileges for private credit creation for centuries and in the US since its very founding.

Andrew Anderson said...

- as they might largely be IF we had not had government privileges for private credit creation for centuries and in the US since its very founding. aa

Yves Smith admitted this when she said "Equity financing is more expensive than debt financing."

Yes indeed - when private credit creation is subsidized by government. And why should those with equity share it when they may use it to legally steal instead? Won't the competition do so if they won't?

Bob said...

What galls me is that some of those photos—piles of emaciated naked bodies, 8/10 deep—were later used to peddle the horrors of the Holocaust—they even used one at Auschwitz—but until the internet, there was no way to prove it.

Strangely enough, Google has nothing to say about this claim.

MRW said...

Bob: Google has nothing to say about this claim. Who said it did? I am telling you that one of the images that was used at Auschwitz (since removed) was one of the images I saw in Yerevan at the Museum. The Armenian genocide images were not available until the internet, unless you went to Yerevan, Armenia. Even then I don’t think the genocide images were uploaded until after the turn of the 21st C, technology being was it was then.

Don’t forget that until the Auschwitz archives were discovered in Russia with the fall of the USSR, Auschwitz had a plaque about 4 million Jews dying there (later cut by 3 million in the early 90s), displays of lampshades claimed to be of human skin, ditto soap made from the fat of Jews, and a whole series of other things that were debunked by those archives. Furthermore, the distinguished historian and researcher Professor Yehuda Bauer of Hebrew University and senior consultant to Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem was the one to debunk these myths starting in 1990.

Bob said...

I wanted to research your claim about the photo.